WELL...That didn't take long! Help Identify Damages

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Bless you…I’ll be able to eat better knowing that my whole truck won’t be torn apart to replace a harness.

Now…I just need to direct the wiring guys to find the right ones. I’m comforted that they’ve done OEM spec restorations on Lambos…so they outta be able to handle this easily.

Just relieved to know it’s not some “non-splice” fiber cable of some sort!!
Yea it’s no 2000s era Audi with its fiber can bus connectors. What a prick those are.
 
Kinda hoping we can just do this…replace the plastic body of the FAKRA.
 
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It would be REAL easy to rig up a flashbang under the dash, tied to the headlight switch bezel. Yank the bezel off without first disarming it, and kiss your eardrums goodbye - especially if they entered through the rear slider... that will provide maximum over-pressure in the cabin upon detonation. "Hello, 911? Yes - I'd like to report an attempted vehicle theft. The perps are easy to spot - they're the ones in the ER with blood leaking from their ears."
 
It would be REAL easy to rig up a flashbang under the dash, tied to the headlight switch bezel. Yank the bezel off without first disarming it, and kiss your eardrums goodbye - especially if they entered through the rear slider... that will provide maximum over-pressure in the cabin upon detonation. "Hello, 911? Yes - I'd like to report an attempted vehicle theft. The perps are easy to spot - they're the ones in the ER with blood leaking from their ears."
This is better, get the primer adapter, far cheaper in the end and less interior damage
 
This is better, get the primer adapter, far cheaper in the end and less interior damage
Think he is going less for hearing them break in and more for them never hearing again! I'm still for sharp wire on a zip, trap them like a damn cyote going under your fence for chickens.
 
Couldn't that be rigged on a rambar to go off before they get inside the back window 🤔🧨
 
It would be REAL easy to rig up a flashbang under the dash, tied to the headlight switch bezel. Yank the bezel off without first disarming it, and kiss your eardrums goodbye - especially if they entered through the rear slider... that will provide maximum over-pressure in the cabin upon detonation. "Hello, 911? Yes - I'd like to report an attempted vehicle theft. The perps are easy to spot - they're the ones in the ER with blood leaking from their ears."
Hmmmm...

I bought a 150db train air horn but didn't want to install it in replacement to factory horn. Now it got me thinking.

Put a push button switch (nc side when not being pressed) under the headlight panel. Remove the panel and the air horn goes off. They may need wipe themselves when it goes off.

I like it, thanks
 
It would be REAL easy to rig up a flashbang under the dash, tied to the headlight switch bezel. Yank the bezel off without first disarming it, and kiss your eardrums goodbye - especially if they entered through the rear slider... that will provide maximum over-pressure in the cabin upon detonation. "Hello, 911? Yes - I'd like to report an attempted vehicle theft. The perps are easy to spot - they're the ones in the ER with blood leaking from their ears."
 
That was just a little noisemaker - he was still able to see and maintain balance immediately afterwards. I'm talking about an actual M84 flashbang, which would have left him blinded for a good 5 seconds, deaf for a good while, and his inner ear turning like a maytag on the spin cycle.
 
That was just a little noisemaker - he was still able to see and maintain balance immediately afterwards. I'm talking about an actual M84 flashbang, which would have left him blinded for a good 5 seconds, deaf for a good while, and his inner ear turning like a maytag on the spin cycle.
Sounds good....but what is the availability of an M84?
 
OK. So…just got back from my meeting at the shop and Jon’s consultation. They all think it could have been worse, but for me…it’s bad enough.

First, the reason the airbag plugs were out was because they yanked the headliner down to look for the AirTag. Turns out that’s a REAL common place others have hidden them. So, the headliner is buckled and will be replaced.

They pulled the fuel module, which was easy to replace and get the truck running. So that’s good.

Now for the not-so-good. The monkeys broke the FAKRA connectors when they yanked the cables off of the CVMP module to kill the GPS. The diagnostic scan said all the other wiring was intact. The module is an easy replacement, but now..the problem is that the wiring may have to be replaced if those plastic FAKRA locking hubs can’t be replaced.

I’m really hoping it’s a matter of buying those pieces, and then just snapping them over the mini-sna connectors. Otherwise, the whole harness will have to be replaced…and, even though they will try NOT to remove the dash…I’m preparing my stomach for the worst.

Here are the connectors. Would love it if someone has experience with these, or can point me in the direction.

Oh, and Jon is everything everyone says…and more…and he hasn’t even started to work yet!
when my truck was stolen the whole body wiring harness had to be replaced and the truck sat at the dealership for 3 fucking months.
 
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Well take a read of my post, there is a direct correlation from politics to police effectiveness and general law enforcement. The weakest places have the highest theft. Its a fact.
go ahead and provide that data showing the direct correlation and causation.
 
go ahead and provide that data showing the direct correlation and causation.
The data is not only out there but you can see it with your own eyes. Illinois passed a no cash bond thing. Someone can do a home invasion, get caught and just get an appearance ticket unless they caused injury or threatened death or some dumb shit so politics let them get away with even more and the police can do nothing to stop it.
 
go ahead and provide that data showing the direct correlation and causation.
I’m ex LE for years, all the way to captain so I don’t need to justify it. I lived it. Luckily I left as things got weaker and more pathetic and that was in democrat controlled areas. Comes with the territory.

some examples:
NJ, majority of police departments have a do not pursue rule for “safety” however the attorney general passed guidance a few years ago, stating that pursuits, which are always reviewed by the state, are discouraged in general with no citation to reason. In addition, NJ has had an no bond hold law for some time now, which if you did evade and were caught, your out before I’m done with the paperwork.

California, reclassification of theft, retail theft and other “low value crime” from felonies to misdemeanors in the majority of cities. There are some areas where sheriffs dept are the holdouts and actually still do their job. ONLY LAST MONTH did legislature get discussed to heighten penalties on auto theft and other significant value crime. Where have they been for 6 years?

NY and NYC, only recently cracked down on fraudulent plates but prior to this ran ramapant, due to “cuffing” both NYPD and other locality departments from enforcing laws and again like NJ, no bond rules so they are almost immediately out to go do it again.

Texas & Atlanta, Dallas and Houston, as well as Atlanta in Georgia, the 3 spokes of fraud. Almost all of the credit card, auto theft and related criminal enterprise operate in these 3 cities. Why? Because local (not state) ordinances prohibit police from doing their job, and again, no bond laws.

Those are the easiest ones that are on my mind. Google has the rest for the lazy. Sitting here acting like if you buy something and don’t protect it because crime is illegal, must educate themselves to help protect themselves. ONLY YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR YOU. This was a quote on the wall back in the academy and it’s never been more true today.

Policies created by elected officials hamper actual crime adjudication from occurring and as a result in many cities, they have become nice to criminals to keep from jail crowding because that doesn’t help their numbers when departments submit to the FBI the stats of crimes committed and processed, therefore appearing like a better area. It is a fact, it has been reported on numerous times and now the FBI is also reporting it. An example is many anti-2nd amendment cities reporting low gun crime to coincide with their hard stances on guns, however their homicide numbers, murder with a deadly weapon are through the roof. Because it’s how you dress it up inside of a higher offense.

Years back, if you caught an auto thief, the car was impounded, the individual served 10-20yrs and you turned them on their gang, and got them all. Now it’s sorry Jonny for handcuffing you, see you next week when you rob another charger.

Let’s not forget the last most interesting item.
Everyone profits off auto theft except you.
 
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I’m ex LE for years, all the way to captain so I don’t need to justify it. I lived it. Luckily I left as things got weaker and more pathetic and that was in democrat controlled areas. Comes with the territory.

some examples:
NJ, majority of police departments have a do not pursue rule for “safety” however the attorney general passed guidance a few years ago, stating that pursuits, which are always reviewed by the state, are discouraged in general with no citation to reason. In addition, NJ has had an no bond hold law for some time now, which if you did evade and were caught, your out before I’m done with the paperwork.

California, reclassification of theft, retail theft and other “low value crime” from felonies to misdemeanors in the majority of cities. There are some areas where sheriffs dept are the holdouts and actually still do their job. ONLY LAST MONTH did legislature get discussed to heighten penalties on auto theft and other significant value crime. Where have they been for 6 years?

NY and NYC, only recently cracked down on fraudulent plates but prior to this ran ramapant, due to “cuffing” both NYPD and other locality departments from enforcing laws and again like NJ, no bond rules so they are almost immediately out to go do it again.

Texas & Atlanta, Dallas and Houston, as well as Atlanta in Georgia, the 3 spokes of fraud. Almost all of the credit card, auto theft and related criminal enterprise operate in these 3 cities. Why? Because local (not state) ordinances prohibit police from doing their job, and again, no bond laws.

Those are the easiest ones that are on my mind. Google has the rest for the lazy. Sitting here acting like if you buy something and don’t protect it because crime is illegal, must educate themselves to help protect themselves. ONLY YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR YOU. This was a quote on the wall back in the academy and it’s never been more true today.

Policies created by elected officials hamper actual crime adjudication from occurring and as a result in many cities, they have become nice to criminals to keep from jail crowding because that doesn’t help their numbers when departments submit to the FBI the stats of crimes committed and processed, therefore appearing like a better area. It is a fact, it has been reported on numerous times and now the FBI is also reporting it. An example is many anti-2nd amendment cities reporting low gun crime to coincide with their hard stances on guns, however their homicide numbers, murder with a deadly weapon are through the roof. Because it’s how you dress it up inside of a higher offense.

Years back, if you caught an auto thief, the car was impounded, the individual served 10-20yrs and you turned them on their gang, and got them all. Now it’s sorry Jonny for handcuffing you, see you next week when you rob another charger.

Let’s not forget the last most interesting item.
Everyone profits off auto theft except you.
Thanks for your service but in my opinion you are missing ALOT of the nuance and likely pretty politically biased based on your statements here and previous posts. So let’s go through all this:

It is always important to present factual data and research findings that provide a broader and more accurate perspective on the impact of political party policies on crime. Here is an analysis of each point raised:

### 1. **New Jersey Pursuit and Bond Policies**

**Claim**: NJ discourages police pursuits and has a no bond hold law leading to criminals being released quickly.

**Debunk**:
- **Pursuit Policies**: New Jersey's pursuit policies are designed to enhance public safety by reducing high-speed chases, which can be dangerous for both officers and civilians. A study by the National Institute of Justice found that police pursuits can lead to significant injuries and fatalities. The policy aims to minimize these risks.
- **No Bond Hold Law**: The New Jersey Criminal Justice Reform Act implemented in 2017 shifted from a cash bail system to a risk-based system. According to the New Jersey Judiciary’s report, the pretrial release rates did not significantly change the rate of re-offense or failure to appear in court, indicating that the reform did not compromise public safety.

### 2. **California Reclassification of Crimes**

**Claim**: Reclassification of theft and other crimes from felonies to misdemeanors has led to increased crime.

**Debunk**:
- **Prop 47**: Proposition 47, passed in 2014, reclassified certain non-violent crimes as misdemeanors. The Public Policy Institute of California found that while there was an initial increase in larceny rates, overall crime rates in California have not surged due to this reclassification. In fact, violent crime rates have remained relatively stable.

### 3. **New York Bond and Fraudulent Plates Policies**

**Claim**: NY and NYC’s no bond rules and lenient policies on fraudulent plates have led to increased crime.

**Debunk**:
- **Bail Reform**: New York’s bail reform law aimed to reduce pretrial detention for non-violent offenses. Research by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice found that the reform did not lead to a significant increase in re-offense rates among those released.
- **Fraudulent Plates**: Enforcement against fraudulent plates and other vehicle-related crimes is ongoing. The NYPD has conducted operations specifically targeting these issues, and recent crackdowns indicate active law enforcement efforts rather than neglect.

### 4. **Texas and Atlanta Policies on Fraud and Auto Theft**

**Claim**: Local ordinances in Texas cities and Atlanta prevent police from effectively combating credit card fraud and auto theft.

**Debunk**:
- **Crime Rates and Enforcement**: Data from the Texas Department of Public Safety and the Georgia Bureau of Investigation show that while certain crimes like auto theft have fluctuated, both states have active initiatives and task forces dedicated to combating these issues. Claims that local ordinances outright prevent police from acting are not supported by legislative or enforcement records.

### 5. **General Claim on Policies Hampering Crime Adjudication**

**Claim**: Policies created by elected officials hinder crime adjudication, leading to misreported crime statistics.

**Debunk**:
- **Policy Impact**: Crime rates and their reporting are influenced by a variety of factors, including economic conditions, law enforcement strategies, and community programs. Studies, including those from the Brennan Center for Justice, indicate that there is no clear evidence that political party control alone significantly impacts overall crime rates.
- **Crime Statistics**: Misreporting crime statistics is a serious accusation. The FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program and the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) have established standards to ensure the accuracy and reliability of crime data reported by law enforcement agencies across the country.

### 6. **Auto Theft and Profit Claims**

**Claim**: Everyone profits from auto theft except the victim.

**Debunk**:
- **Insurance and Law Enforcement**: Auto theft is a complex issue involving various stakeholders. While insurance companies do pay claims, they also invest in anti-theft technologies and collaborate with law enforcement to reduce theft rates. Data from the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) shows that coordinated efforts between insurers and police have led to significant recoveries and arrests in auto theft cases.

While your experiences as a former law enforcement officer are valid, the claims made in the post do not fully align with broader data and research findings. Crime rates and enforcement policies are multifaceted issues influenced by numerous factors beyond political control. It is crucial to rely on comprehensive data and studies to understand these dynamics accurately. We rely on data and the science to choose IGLA as opposed to the bias of those who “believe” ravelco is better or even in the same class, we should do the same here. Belief your mom, all others bring data.
 
Thanks for your service but in my opinion you are missing ALOT of the nuance and likely pretty politically biased based on your statements here and previous posts. So let’s go through all this:

It is always important to present factual data and research findings that provide a broader and more accurate perspective on the impact of political party policies on crime. Here is an analysis of each point raised:

### 1. **New Jersey Pursuit and Bond Policies**

**Claim**: NJ discourages police pursuits and has a no bond hold law leading to criminals being released quickly.

**Debunk**:
- **Pursuit Policies**: New Jersey's pursuit policies are designed to enhance public safety by reducing high-speed chases, which can be dangerous for both officers and civilians. A study by the National Institute of Justice found that police pursuits can lead to significant injuries and fatalities. The policy aims to minimize these risks.
- **No Bond Hold Law**: The New Jersey Criminal Justice Reform Act implemented in 2017 shifted from a cash bail system to a risk-based system. According to the New Jersey Judiciary’s report, the pretrial release rates did not significantly change the rate of re-offense or failure to appear in court, indicating that the reform did not compromise public safety.

### 2. **California Reclassification of Crimes**

**Claim**: Reclassification of theft and other crimes from felonies to misdemeanors has led to increased crime.

**Debunk**:
- **Prop 47**: Proposition 47, passed in 2014, reclassified certain non-violent crimes as misdemeanors. The Public Policy Institute of California found that while there was an initial increase in larceny rates, overall crime rates in California have not surged due to this reclassification. In fact, violent crime rates have remained relatively stable.

### 3. **New York Bond and Fraudulent Plates Policies**

**Claim**: NY and NYC’s no bond rules and lenient policies on fraudulent plates have led to increased crime.

**Debunk**:
- **Bail Reform**: New York’s bail reform law aimed to reduce pretrial detention for non-violent offenses. Research by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice found that the reform did not lead to a significant increase in re-offense rates among those released.
- **Fraudulent Plates**: Enforcement against fraudulent plates and other vehicle-related crimes is ongoing. The NYPD has conducted operations specifically targeting these issues, and recent crackdowns indicate active law enforcement efforts rather than neglect.

### 4. **Texas and Atlanta Policies on Fraud and Auto Theft**

**Claim**: Local ordinances in Texas cities and Atlanta prevent police from effectively combating credit card fraud and auto theft.

**Debunk**:
- **Crime Rates and Enforcement**: Data from the Texas Department of Public Safety and the Georgia Bureau of Investigation show that while certain crimes like auto theft have fluctuated, both states have active initiatives and task forces dedicated to combating these issues. Claims that local ordinances outright prevent police from acting are not supported by legislative or enforcement records.

### 5. **General Claim on Policies Hampering Crime Adjudication**

**Claim**: Policies created by elected officials hinder crime adjudication, leading to misreported crime statistics.

**Debunk**:
- **Policy Impact**: Crime rates and their reporting are influenced by a variety of factors, including economic conditions, law enforcement strategies, and community programs. Studies, including those from the Brennan Center for Justice, indicate that there is no clear evidence that political party control alone significantly impacts overall crime rates.
- **Crime Statistics**: Misreporting crime statistics is a serious accusation. The FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program and the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) have established standards to ensure the accuracy and reliability of crime data reported by law enforcement agencies across the country.

### 6. **Auto Theft and Profit Claims**

**Claim**: Everyone profits from auto theft except the victim.

**Debunk**:
- **Insurance and Law Enforcement**: Auto theft is a complex issue involving various stakeholders. While insurance companies do pay claims, they also invest in anti-theft technologies and collaborate with law enforcement to reduce theft rates. Data from the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) shows that coordinated efforts between insurers and police have led to significant recoveries and arrests in auto theft cases.

While your experiences as a former law enforcement officer are valid, the claims made in the post do not fully align with broader data and research findings. Crime rates and enforcement policies are multifaceted issues influenced by numerous factors beyond political control. It is crucial to rely on comprehensive data and studies to understand these dynamics accurately. We rely on data and the science to choose IGLA as opposed to the bias of those who “believe” ravelco is better or even in the same class, we should do the same here. Belief your mom, all others bring data.
I’m so glad my experiences in life were validated by some guy on a car forum. Regardless of my political views, when you’ve dealt with the public for many years and been through major policy change in many industries for many years (I haven’t just been LEO in my life) you see the truth beyond what people can google and spew off some statements online. I’ll always believe what I see and experience over what I read.

Luckily in America, you’re allowed to believe what you want. Keep thinking pursuit rules are for safety, that’s a laugh, There are plenty of folks that believe in the Easter bunny also. No judgement.

I won’t go into any of the other things you wrote, but Just for fun:
Claim: you think Ravelco is better than IGLA.
Debunk: I have both, I’ll never buy Ravelco again, but it’s better than nothing.
 
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